Authors: Dawa Penjor, Sabitra Pradhan, and Michael B. Thomas
Citation: How to cite: Penjor, Dawa, Sabitra Pradhan and Michael B. Thomas. 2017. Updated Fungi of Bhutan Checklist. National Mushroom Centre, Ministry of Agriculture and Forests. Serbithang, Thimphu, Bhutan. http://www.bhutanbiodiversity.net/, accessed yyyy-mm-dd.
Less Details
Locality: Bhutan (27.332740, 90.439450)
Abstract: This is a working draft and brings together a fungi species checklists from 2 seminal publications on the fungi of Bhutan. In Bhutan, there are more than 350 species which been identified by either a scientific name or local name from ethnobotanical surveys on traditional crop uses from several districts including Thimphu, Paro, Bumthang, Tashiyangtse, Punakha and Sarpang dzongkas. However, the vast majority of the biodiversity in not yet been identified or collected. It is speculated that  Bhutan's mycoflora is likely much larger due to its diverse climatic and geographical conditions.

In 1999, the Department of Botany, Panjab University published the first record of the fungi in Bhutan. This was a result extensive plant exploration/collection trips made by Panjab University faculty, and the efforts have culminated in the publication of several floras/monographs on different plant groups including fungi. The publication of “Fungi of Bhutan" by Dr I.B. Prasher is another addition to the series of monographs on Himalayan Fungi published from the mycology lab of the department. It is based on detailed investigation of 1500 fungal collections made during 1979-1983. This comprehensive work deals with 306 species under 138 genera and is the first of its kind on the systematic and ecology of fungi of Bhutan. As many as 6 species were described for the first time and recent nomenclatural details were provided for others.

References
Mata, Miagro, Dawa Penjor and Sabitra Pradhan. 2010. Fungi of Bhutan. National Mushroom Centre, Ministry of Agriculture and Forests, Thimphu, Bhutan. p. 316.

Prasher, I. B. 1999. Fungi of Bhutan: myxomycota leotiales, pezizales, xylariales, and holobasidiomycetideae. Dehra Dun: International Book Distributors. p. 120.

Notes: Project support by the United States Fulbright Scholar Program, Washington, D.C. (2017). The Fulbright Program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government.

Options
Search:
Common Names
Synonyms
Filter:
Common Names
Display as Images
Notes & Vouchers
Taxon Authors
Show Taxa Alphabetically
Families: 58
Genera: 121
Species: 210 (species rank)
Total Taxa: 210 (including subsp. and var.)
Edible, Solitary or sometimes gregarious and terrestrial, Mycobank
Edible, Terrestrial and scattered, Mycobank
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Insect Fungi, source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Edible, Terrestrial and solitary or in groups of few, Mycobank
Edible, Terrestrial and gregarious to clustered, often on , Mycobank
Edible, Terrestrial and solitary to gregarious, Mycobank
Posionous, Terrestrial and solitary to scattered, Mycobank
Edible, Terrestrial and scattered to gregarious, Mycobank
Edible, Terrestrial and scattered to gregarious, Mycobank
Posionous, Terrestrial and solitary or in a group of few, Mycobank
Posionous, Terrestrial and scattered to gregarious, Mycobank
Edible when well-cooked, Solitary to gregarious and terrestrial, Mycobank
Edible, On the ground, on decayed parts of wood, mostly at, Mycobank
Insect Fungi
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Inedible, On dry sandy soil or under conifer trees and other, Mycobank
Inedible, Terrestrial and scattered to solitary, Mycobank
Edible, On dead logs, branches and stumps and solitary to , Mycobank
Inedible, On rooting cones of conifers and humus and solitar, Mycobank
Too small for culinary purpose, Solitary and on the lawns among grasses, Mycobank
Edible, Terrestrial and solitary to scattered, Mycobank
Edible, Terrestrial and solitary to scattered and sometime, Mycobank
Edible, Solitary, scattered, or gregariously and terrestri, Mycobank
Edible, Solitary or gregariously and terrestrial, Mycobank
Unknown, Lignicolous on dead logs and stumps, Mycobank
Edible when young, Terrestrial and scattered to gregarious in grasses, Mycobank
Edible, Terrestrial and scattered to gregarious, Mycobank
Edible, Terrestrial and solitary to scattered and sometime, Mycobank
Inedible, On decayed hardwood logs and sticks and scattered , Mycobank
Edible, Solitary to gregarious and terrestrial under hard , Mycobank
Edible, Solitary, scattered or gregariously growing on lit, Mycobank
Posionous, Growing scattered or gregariously on litters or te, Mycobank
Edible, Solitary to scattered, or gregariously in grassy a, Mycobank
Inedible, likely to be poisonous, Terrestrial on parks, gardens, fields, solitary to, Mycobank
Edible and delicious when fruit bodies are very young, Terrestrial beside highways, trails and disturbed , Mycobank
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Inedible, Terrestrial and scatted to gregarious, Mycobank
Edible, Terrestrial and scatted to gregarious, Mycobank
Unknown, Solitary to densely gregariously on woodland debri, Mycobank
Unknown, Scattered or gregarious on dead wood or vegetative, Mycobank
Inedible, On decaying wood and solitary to scattered, Mycobank
Inedible, Growing scattered and terrestrial, Mycobank
Scattered to clustered and growing on wood cracks , Mycobank
Unknown, Scattered and terrestrial, Mycobank
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Insect Fungi, source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Unknown, On woods among mosses and lichens and gregariously, Mycobank
Edible but it has strong sour taste which some may not like, Solitary to gregarious on woods, Mycobank
Inedible, Solitary and grows on dead woods or from wounds in, Mycobank
Inedible due to its woody texture, On dead stumps and logs and occasionally on living, Mycobank
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Inedible, Solitary or gregarious or sometimes caespitose too, Mycobank
Edible, Scattered to gregarious and terrestrial, Mycobank
Edible with caution, Terrestrial and scattered or gregariously, Mycobank
Unknown, Scattered to gregarious and on the ground among th, Mycobank
Posionous, Terrestrial and solitary to gregarious, Mycobank
Unknown, Terrestrial amongst leaf litters and scattered to , Mycobank
Edible, Terrestrial and solitary to gregarious, Mycobank
Inedible, On the litter under trees and scattered to gregari, Mycobank
Edible, Solitary on living trees or on the cut ends of rec, Mycobank
Unknown, Growing on well-decayed wood or on the ground and , Mycobank
Unknown, Growing solitary, scattered or clustered together , Mycobank
Hydnum repandum L. - Chey Shamong
Edible, Terrestrial and solitary to gregarious, Mycobank
Inedible, Lignicolous and gregarious, Mycobank
Inedible, Terrestrial on leaf litter and decayed logs and sc, Mycobank
Inedible, Terrestrial under hardwoods or conifers and solita, Mycobank
Edible, but identification requires great care, Terrestrial, occasionally on wood and solitary, sc, Mycobank
Considered edible in Bhutan, Terrestrial and scattered or gregarious, Mycobank
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Posionous, On decaying logs and stumps of hardwoods and conif, Mycobank
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Edible, Terrestrial and solitary to scattered or gregariou, Mycobank
Edible, Scattered to gregarious and terrestrial, Mycobank
Inedible, Terrestrial and lignicolous and solitary and somet, Mycobank
Edible when well cooked, Terrestrial and scatted to gregarious, Mycobank
Not recommended, Terrestrial and scatted to gregarious, Mycobank
Terrestrial among mosses and scattered to solitary, Mycobank
Edible but needs to be cooked well, Sometimes solitary but more often in over lapping , Mycobank
Edible, Terrestrial on leave litter and scattered to solit, Mycobank
Edible, Terrestrial among mosses and solitary to scattered, Mycobank
Unknown, Gregarious and terrestrial among mosses, Mycobank
Edible if well cooked, but it is wise to try a very small portion at first because they have been known to disagree with some people., Often growing in fairy rings and terrestrial, Mycobank
Inedible, Terrestrial or on wood and solitary to scattered, Mycobank
Inedible, Terrestrial and gregarious but sometimes solitary, Mycobank
Edible when young., On plant debris and fertile soil and solitary or s, Mycobank
Edible, Terrestrial and caespitose, Mycobank
Edible, Terrestrial and scattered to gregarious, Mycobank
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Unknown, Gregarious, and lignicolous, Mycobank
Edible when young in the egg stage., Solitary to gregarious and terrestrial, Mycobank
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Unknown, : Terrestrial and solitary to gregarious, Mycobank
Poisonous unless well cooked, Terrestrial on manure and gregarious to cespitose, Mycobank
The egg stage, which lacks the disgusting smell, is edible though not tasty, Scatted to gregarious on rotting wood in gardens a, Mycobank
Unknown, Terrestrial and solitary, Mycobank
Inedible, Lignicolous and scattered to gregarious, Mycobank
Edible, Lignicolous and gregarious to caespitose, Mycobank
Edible, Lignicolous and gregarious, Mycobank
Unknown, Lignicolous and gregarious, Mycobank
Edible but very leathery even after cooking, Lignicolous and solitary, Mycobank
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Edible and medicinal, Lignicolous and scattered to gregarious, Mycobank
Inedible, Terrestrial and scattered to gregarious, Mycobank
Inedible, Solitary or caespitose and lignicolous, Mycobank
Edible, Terrestrial and caespitose, Mycobank
Edible, Terrestrial and solitary, scattered, or in groups, Mycobank
Edible, Terrestrial and solitary to gregarious, Mycobank
Edible, Terrestrial and solitary to gregarious, Mycobank
Edible, Terrestrial and solitary to scattered, Mycobank
Russula delica Fr. - Gah Shamong
Edible, Terrestrial and solitary to scatted and gregarious, Mycobank
Poisonous, Terrestrial and solitary to scatted, Mycobank
Poisonous, Terrestrial and solitary to gregarious, Mycobank
Edible but not good taste, Solitary to scattered and terrestrial, Mycobank
Inedible, Solitary, scattered, or gregariously and terrestri, Mycobank
Unknown, Terrestrial among the mosses and solitary to scatt, Mycobank
Edible, Gregarious, fused together and growing on decayed , Mycobank
Unknown, Growing gregariously or in clusters and lignicolou, Mycobank
Edible, On the wood debris and at the base of the trees an, Mycobank
Edible, Scatted to gregarious and growing on humus or rott, Mycobank
Edible but tough and tasteless, Scattered to gregarious or even clustered, sometim, Mycobank
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Inedible, Solitary to gregarious and terrestrial on animal d, Mycobank
Edible, Scattered to gregarious and terrestrial under pine, Mycobank
Insect Fungi, source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Unknown, Terrestrial and solitary or sometimes gregariously, Mycobank
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Inedible, Lignicolous and solitary to gregarious, Mycobank
Edible and medicinal, Lignicolous on decaying tree trunks and branches a, Mycobank
Harmless but very tough for culinary, Gregarious and lignicolous, Mycobank
Inedible, Lignicolous on rotting wood and gregarious, Mycobank
Unknown, Solitary to gregarious and terrestrial in moss and, Mycobank
Edible, Terrestrial mainly in oak and spruce forest in Bhu, Mycobank
Edible, being consumed in Bhutan especially in Ura, Bumthang. Not recommended by David Aurora (Mushrooms Demystified), Terrestrial and scattered to gregariously, Mycobank
Consider edible by some but not recommended, Solitary to gregarious and most of the time it is , Mycobank
Insect Fungi, Mycobank , source: Nigel L. Hywel-Jones
Unknown, Lignicolous and gregarious, Mycobank
Inedible, Terrestrial and solitary to scattered, Mycobank
Insect Fungi